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We offer full framework consultation or you may need assistance with just one area. Please contact us for information on how we may assist you with managing your practical business processes.

 

We offer additional support to help you maintain the processes that you have developed.  Please visit our Support page for more information.

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The Understated Value of Hiring A Bookkeeper

Leijun Campbell - Wednesday, February 28, 2018

 
Small business owners and solopreneurs continue to make up a growing percentage of the American workforce starting companies that create innovate products and services or maintaining the quality goods they have sold to their customers for the past several decades.

 

If you fall into this category of business owners, you know how hard you have to work to juggle variety of tasks that sometimes may completely be out of your wheelhouse. Finding a local or remote expert such as a bookkeeper, especially in such a frenetic like the middle of tax season (occurring right now if you haven't noticed), can truly help relieve difficult financial management situations. This extra addition to your team can add a third-party, objective perspective that provides incredible value in the end.

 

Bringing in a bookkeeper has several advantages:

 

1) Full focus on your business and day-to-day operations: Often when you are the sole owner or even a co-owner, you can get bogged down in every task imaginable such as administrative work, running out to the post office, cleaning the shop if you have a storefront and more. Plus you want to make sure your customers get the bulk of your attention. By the time you reach the end of the day where you begin looking at those financial documents, you want to throw your hands in the air. Learning to delegate your bookkeeping to a trained professional will alleviate this stress and the person you hire will actually save you money.
 
2) Bookkeepers focus on specific industries: Whether you are a real estate or insurance agency or own a restaurant or retail space, you can find a bookkeeper who specializes in that industry (even though most have a general understanding of most businesses). Since most bookkeepers juggle multiple clients and keep track of the latest trends and updated rules and regulations that you and they need to know to help your business succeed.
 
3) You have the flexibility to hire a bookkeeper on a contract or full-time basis: Before you begin your search for a bookkeeper, you obviously will look at your overall budget to see what you can afford. However, even you cannot hire someone full-time, do not let your trepidation prevent you from hiring a bookkeeper on a contract basis. These contractors bring in crucial knowledge and analysis for cash balances and expenditures every week or month, allowing you to build a relationship and trust that you may not have even expected. From there, you will gain a wealth of knowledge of your company's financial health that can help you start planning for even further down the road.

 

If you have questions about bookkeeping, contact us at leijun@campbellbusinessservices.com!


 

Management Goals for the Rest of the Summer

Leijun Campbell - Friday, July 21, 2017

We recently celebrated the Fourth of July and have now entered into the summer lull that comes before the start of school, Labor Day and the holiday season. As managers and business owners, you have the perfect opportunity to set a few objectives for both the rest of the summer season and the rest of the calendar year.
 
1) Try and implement a unique sales and marketing technique: When business slows and meetings get less frequent because of vacationing employees and clients, you can always try to bring something new to your usual sales approach. Maybe you finally create an ecommerce site for your small store. Maybe you create a Facebook or Twitter page to start expanding your online presence. Maybe you jump start your email marketing efforts by creating a mid-year newsletter detailing all of your successes for the year so far and what you hope to accomplish by year’s end. Whatever you decide to do, keep track of what works and what will need improvement. If you discover great results through a certain technique,
 
2) Hold a summer review meeting: Gather your team at least once or twice over the next few weeks and check the pulse of your company’s culture and teamwork. Allow team members to ask questions about specific projects and pitch ideas for future endeavors. Provide a mission statement and/or vision for the next half of the year. Though you are the manager, you want your team to maintain a sense of ownership over each of their tasks so they can complete them to the best of their ability.

 

3) Recognize objectives completed and audit strategies for any open tasks: As a manager, you realize that celebrating the success of both the company and team members greatly increases morale for the next round of tasks. Take a look and recognize all of the recently completed objectives for the year and analyze reasons that the success occurred. On the other side of the spectrum, examine each of the tasks that have yet to be completed by your team. Are there any missing parts that could help finish the task? If so, you may want to pivot your strategy so you can easily fix the issue and move on to your company’s next project.
 
For more summertime management strategies, contact us today at leijun@campbellbusinessservices.com

Four Practical Points to Prepare for 2017 (Infographic

Leijun Campbell - Thursday, December 22, 2016

Five Steps to Establishing Your Practical Processes

Leijun Campbell - Thursday, October 27, 2016

We present to you a visual representation of last week's blog post on raising the bar with your practical processes at your small business. If you have any questions, email leijun@campbellbusinessservices.com

 

 


Infographic: Four Practical Processes for Your Business

Leijun Campbell - Tuesday, September 27, 2016

 

Operations Management, Sales & Marketing, Financial Management and Talent Management are the four practical processes your business needs to establish from the beginning. See above for how these apply to your company and email leijun@campbellbusinessservices.com if we can help you in any way.

Taking Stock of What You Have: The Need for Process

Leijun Campbell - Friday, September 16, 2016

In any Small Business, there is a prevalent set of business processes that must exist for a strong foundation. These practical processes provide more than a set of rules for you and your employees, but help create and solidify the consistency, efficiency and innovation of your company.

 


 

Here are four essential examples.


1) Of course the goal of a business is to make money; therefore, you need a strong process for your Financial Management. The size of your small business/solo venture will determine how extensive this will need to be. Take the initial steps of setting up a company bank account, ordering a company credit card, choosing your bookkeeping software, creating a budget and documenting your financial procedures. Using the right technology combined with the right professionals allows you to automate this process for the most accurate results, and knowing the amount of assets, liabilities and equity your company has equips you to make smarter financial decisions.

 

2) In order to keep the cash flowing, every business needs to utilize a Sales & Marketing process to keep their name in front of potential clients/customers and service then in good standing. Develop your brand through a mix of traditional approaches and digital practices with a decidedly personal touch; your customers and clients want to know that they matter and that the information you provide benefits them beyond the product or service. For sales, create and maintain a schedule of measurable objectives, goals, benchmarks and checkpoints along with specific procedures for documenting new and current clients. However, give yourself and your sales staff the flexibility to adjust the process if something isn’t working.

 

3) At some point even the solopreneur will find the need for outside help, and for those small businesses that rely on employees, a proficient process for dealing with Talent Management will help ensure less problems. If you haven’t already, create an employee handbook and//or specific orientation process for every new hire. Provide opportunities for professional development and training as often as you can, so that all team members feel invested in the company, no matter how small or large their role actually is. Have weekly, monthly or quarterly “all-staff” meetings as well as an open door policy for feedback and evaluations. Many employees desire to know how they are performing in their position, but often feel too afraid to ask.

 

4) Finally, your company must have an exhaustive Operations Management process that makes everything flow together, bringing all of the above into your products, the who, what, when and even why to your business. Establish essential daily operation policies for employee benefits and sick leave/vacation time, create company objectives and select and cultivate healthy relationships with your vendors. If need be, hire a reliable, coachable and client-oriented operations manager.

 

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Financial Management Part One

Leijun Campbell - Tuesday, August 09, 2016

 

Financial Management is an important Practical Process that should not be treated as an afterthought. You should never be haphazard in your planning and strategies because one major error in accounting or sales can deeply impact your company’s past, present or future.


Here are some important facts you should consider for keeping your company financial healthy.


1) Have a specific bank account for your business only
2) Have a one specific credit card for the business only
3) Have a designated software for financial record keeping, i.e., Quickbooks, Freshbooks, etc.
4) Have a designated financial point person. If this is not your avenue of expertise, hire a reliable trustworthy person to assist in this arena.
5) Have a documented financial process in place
6) Have a system for filing financial paperwork
7) Have a budget – this is a crucial step in the planning

 



Look out for part two of this series later this month.

 

To have tips and lists like this sent directly to your inbox, click HERE!

 


Who's The Boss: Finding Your Perfect Manager

Leijun Campbell - Friday, June 24, 2016

As a business owner, you want to be thoroughly involved with shaping the mission of your company as well as the team members who have joined you. However, you may eventually reach a point where you begin stretching yourself too thin and need someone else to handle daily operations. Here are a few qualities to look for when seeking out a manager that will help drive your vision and team forward.

 

The manager communicates effectively with the team, and in turn, the team trusts the manager - Communication and trust represent two of the most important aspects of any relationship and are incredibly crucial in a business setting. Your manager should be able to articulate expectations, objectives, and measurable goals in a way that motivates your team to perform beyond their potential. If the communication is open and effective, the team will be able to put their trust in that manager and work alongside them to create the best results possible.


The manager stays organized and calm in any situation - Sure, we all lose our cool sometimes, but the manager of your business should have a high enough emotional intelligence to where they do not explode or break down in a stressful environment. Your team looks to the manager for leadership and guidance; they do not want to see their leader crumble. Also, the manager must plan ahead for any and projects and meetings. Nothing strikes fear in the heart of a client or customer like a team who is not prepared to address their needs.


The manager cares about the customers and/or clients they are assisting - The last thing you want in a manager is disinterest or apathy towards the people who ultimately hold your livelihood in their hands. You want a manager who inspires to team members to go beyond what is expected in customer relationships. The manager should be a superb example of service and hospitality. Accepting anything less is detrimental to your team and your business.

 

To have more posts and tips like this sent directly to your inbox, click HERE.



Why Operations Management Is The Heartbeat of Your Small Business

Leijun Campbell - Wednesday, June 01, 2016

Before focusing on elements such as sales & marketing, financial management and talent management and then delegating tasks to those specific departments, a small business owner must understand why an operations manager is so crucial. Operations management sets the tone for the day-to-day tasks necessary for a successful company.

 


 

Here are three ways describing how an operations manager is the heartbeat of your small business:

 

1) Selecting and cultivating relationships with your vendors - No matter how small or large your operation, you will need to contract vendors for office supplies or product distribution. An operations manager will provide you the template for seeking out and using certain vendors, whether that is the schedule for deliveries, certain contact persons or price points for different products.

 

2. Establishing daily procedures for employees - Your policies and procedure manuals are essential to providing structure within your team. Click HERE for a list of items you should include. The procedures developed by your operations manager can help solidify the practical processes for new hire training, team member absences and more.

 

3. Creating company objectives - Before releasing your sales and marketing teams out into the world, you must first provide them a series of company-related goals to meet. These team members look to your guidance to provide them with a mission that permeates all their efforts. Your operations manager can help clarify what is needed for the next month, six month or 1-year period.

 

To have more posts and tips like this sent directly to your inbox, click HERE.

 


What Is Your Management Style?

Leijun Campbell - Friday, May 06, 2016

If you’re the owner of a small business, chances are you manage a team of talented, but sometimes very different, people. You want everyone to succeed, but you also want to establish the way in which you encourage this success.

 

Management Style

 

Here are a few management styles that you can use for your team.

 

1) Authoritative - Depending on the industry in which you and your team work, sometimes you need to be more strict as a leader to make sure your company's tasks are accomplished. You provide clear instructions to make sure every team member understands their part and the best way to succeed in their role. Your assignments have firm deadlines that allow the business to run efficiently.

 

2) Coaching - You focus on measurable goals for each team member and personally meet with them to discuss how to accomplish work-related tasks and to grow in their role at the company. When discussing mistakes and concerns, you try to acknowledge the consequences of the team member's actions, but also find a way to implement constructive criticism and positive reinforcement.

 

3) Collaborative - You enjoy hearing feedback and ideas from the people on your team. Your internal meetings focus heavily on brainstorming strategic endeavors to best reach your customers or clients. You try to offer as many opportunities as possible for innovation while still keeping all parties on task and moving the business forward.

 

To have tips, blogs and checklists sent directly to your inbox, click HERE!



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